Voters in Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina react to impeachment hearing: 'I’m starting to second guess my original opinion'

ABC News 1 month ago

Two key witnesses in the impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump dominated headlines across America on Wednesday when they testified in the House’s first public hearings.

But what did voters really think of the historic proceedings? ABC News spoke to voters in three key states about whether they tuned in and what they thought about the hearing and what the outcome of the inquiry will be.

Former Ambassador to Ukraine William Taylor and Deputy Assistant Secretary of State George Kent testified in front of the House Intelligence Committee on Wednesday.

At the center of the impeachment inquiry has been a phone call on July 25 between Trump and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy, in which Trump asked Zelenskiy to investigate his political rival Joe Biden’s son, Hunter Biden, in exchange for military aid to Ukraine. Critics allege this was a "quid pro quo."

During Wednesday’s hearing, Taylor testified that his staffer was in a restaurant in Ukraine when he overheard Trump on a call with U.S. Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland on July 26 asking about the status of "the investigations."

Republicans have defended Trump, arguing that there couldn’t have been a quid pro quo because Zelenskiy didn’t know that the aid had been withheld at the time of the call on July 25. They also argued that an investigation into the Bidens ultimately never occurred and that the aid was eventually given to Ukraine.

Here’s what voters in New Hampshire, South Carolina and Iowa had to say.

Concord, New Hampshire

Inside Concord’s The Red Arrow Diner, a New Hampshire staple, the televisions were on, but they weren’t tuned to the impeachment hearings. In fact, if you wanted to watch the hearings, you had to go to the television in the hallway near the bathroom.

PHOTO: Inside Concord’s The Red Arrow Diner, a New Hampshire staple, the televisions were on, but they weren’t tuned to the impeachment hearings.
Inside Concord’s The Red Arrow Diner, a New Hampshire staple, the televisions were on, but they weren’t tuned to the impeachment hearings.

It was business as usual, people sitting at tables talking to each other, waitresses talking to patrons and a busy kitchen in the background.

Steven Greene, from Belmont, New Hampshire, only "caught a part" of the impeachment hearings because he’s "not convinced that the impeachment thing is up and up, and...the most important thing on everybody’s mind." Greene said he’d "rather come to Sam’s or Walmart than watch impeachment hearings." However, he said he does plan to watch some of the hearings in the future because "they are such an important part of history."

PHOTO: Steven Greene, from Belmont, New Hampshire, only “caught a part” of the impeachment hearings because he’s “not convinced that the impeachment thing is up and up and on the most important thing on everybody’s mind.”
Steven Greene, from Belmont, New Hampshire, only “caught a part” of the impeachment hearings because he’s “not convinced that the impeachment thing is up and up and on the most important thing on everybody’s mind.”

Greene told ABC News that impeachment "is not really an important issue" for him. Instead, the most important issue for Greene is "fiscal responsibility."

In the back corner of the diner, Rudy Bourget also said he didn’t watch the impeachment hearings on Wednesday because it was the first day of deer hunting season. He said he probably won’t watch future hearings, either, even though he supports impeachment and believes that Trump committed "an abuse of power."

"It depends if I’m home or not," Bourget said.

PHOTO: Rudy Bourget also said he didn’t watch the impeachment hearings today because it was the first day of deer hunting season and said he probably won’t watch future hearings.
Rudy Bourget also said he didn’t watch the impeachment hearings today because it was the first day of deer hunting season and said he probably won’t watch future hearings.

Bourget calls himself a "middle-of-the-road moderate" who doesn’t "like [the] extreme right or extreme left." Impeachment isn’t an important issue to Bourget, he said. He said he finds the environment, budget deficit, and the U.S.’s credibility in the world as being his top three most important issues for voting. Bourget also said that impeachment would be his fourth issue, but noted that in four or five years Trump will be out of office and the environment and budget deficit will still exist.

—Christopher Donato, ABC News campaign reporter

Columbia, South Carolina

Voters in South Carolina expressed deep concern about the state of the White House and how the impeachment inquiry will affect the 2020 election.

Patrons inside Lizard Thickets restaurant, a Southern dining favorite, said they only caught a glimpse of the hearing before work but hoped that the president would be held accountable if the alleged "quid pro quo" was confirmed through the Democrats' investigation.

Steve Davis, who is from Columbia, told ABC News that this is familiar territory for him as he had watched the impeachment hearings of former president Richard Nixon in 1974. Davis said he would be surprised if the investigation leads to Trump being removed from office.

"He’ll never get impeached because [of] the Senate. There won’t be enough votes there to impeach him. But I think the House might do it," Davis told ABC News.

Downtown in the Palmetto state capital, Marvin Coon said the impeachment inquiry further complicates the election as Trump and the Democratic presidential candidates continue to run their campaigns throughout the investigation.

"I actually feel like it's not fair to [Trump] to go through impeachment at this time during an election process," said Coon, who is from Delaware but now lives in Columbia. "I’m sure his mindset is [on] how to get reelected. But this will be a distraction for him, as well as for the public. I think we need to look at all the candidates and pick the best one, but it will be almost impossible to concentrate on running for reelection when he’s got this dark cloud over him."

—Briana Stewart, ABC News campaign reporter

Des Moines, Iowa

There are no TVs at the Waveland Cafe, but inside, there are patrons scrolling through their phones, reading about and watching Wednesday's impeachment hearing.

PHOTO: There are no TVs at the Waveland Cafe but inside, there are patrons scrolling on their phones, reading about and watching todays impeachment hearing.
There are no TVs at the Waveland Cafe but inside, there are patrons scrolling on their phones, reading about and watching today's impeachment hearing.

Sitting at the cafe's counter is Judd Penny, an Iowa resident, businessman and Army veteran who is concerned about the impeachment hearings.

"The leader that we elected to do this job and represent us isn't doing his job. He's breaking laws. That's a problem," Penny told ABC News.

PHOTO: Judd Penny is an Iowa resident, businessman and Army veteran who is concerned about the impeachment hearings.
Judd Penny is an Iowa resident, businessman and Army veteran who is concerned about the impeachment hearings.

After listening to some of the impeachment hearings on the radio, Penny said he would like to hear more.

"This is about our future. It’s a big deal." With a Masters degree in political economy from Iowa State University, Penny said he is well read on what’s going on in the political field, but worries that constant impeachment news coverage could fatigue some Iowans.

Des Moines native Stephanie Morrison wasn’t sure impeachment was a "great thing," but after watching Taylor and Kent testify this morning, she told ABC News, "I'm starting to second guess my original opinion."

PHOTO: Des Moines native, Stephanie Morrison wasn’t sure impeachment was a great thing, but after watching Ambassador Taylor and Mr. Kent testify this morning, she told ABC News, Im starting to second guess my original opinion.
Des Moines native, Stephanie Morrison wasn’t sure impeachment was a "great thing," but after watching Ambassador Taylor and Mr. Kent testify this morning, she told ABC News, "I'm starting to second guess my original opinion."

Identifying as politically "in the middle," Morrison said the impeachment hearing allowed her to hear the non-biased facts.

"It's important to the country for everybody to watch [the hearings] and to learn the exact details of everything," Morrison told ABC News.

—Samantha Sergi, ABC News campaign reporter


Source link
Read also:
Breitbart › Politics › 1 month ago
Pete Buttigieg is targeting white voters in Iowa with a new ad and arguing black voters in South Carolina will not worry about his sexuality.
New York Daily News › Politics › 1 week ago
WASHINGTON Guess which Democrat leads the pack in Iowa and New Hampshire, and which one has launched a crusade challenging the tradition of holding the first
NBC News › Politics › 1 day ago
Independent voters in New Hampshire greeted the House Judiciary Committee's decision to authorize articles of impeachment with skepticism, but said it likely won't impact the way they vote.
Washington Examiner › 1 month ago
FLORENCE, South Carolina — As Joe Biden slips behind Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren in some national polls and in the early primary states of Iowa and New Hampshire, South Carolina has been his stronghold of support. But there are signs he is...
Washington Examiner › Politics › 2 weeks ago
The six senators seeking the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination expected to spend the bulk of January in early nominating states such as Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada, and South Carolina.
Breitbart › Politics › 1 month ago
Julián Castro is laying off staff in New Hampshire and South Carolina to focus on Iowa and Nevada, according to a report.
New York Post › 1 month ago
Michael Bloomberg is taking a hard look at Nevada, South Carolina and 14 states that vote in March’s “Super Tuesday” — rather than Iowa and New Hampshire — as he prepares his late presidential bid, The Post has learned. The move will give...
CNN › Politics › 1 month ago
CNN's Miguel Marquez spoke with voters in Howard County, Iowa, and asked what they think of the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump.
Washington Examiner › 1 month ago
ROCK HILL, South Carolina — Pete Buttigieg’s efforts targeting religious voters in South Carolina underscores his challenge in appealing to black voters and overcoming the hurdle posed by his sexual orientation.
CBS News › 2 months ago
Voters at a watch party in New Hampshire were concerned about the divisiveness and were excited to hear about foreign policy, opioids and guns during Tuesday night's debate. At Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa, the crowd was friendly toward Senator...
Sign In

Sign in to follow sources and tags you love, and get personalized stories.

Continue with Google
OR